Repository

The BIWFC Repository aims to archive all available information related to the field.

Kangaroo

Search for information on a specific species or issue related to wildlife fertility control.  Articles are added on a rolling basis.  If you would like your work to be included in the repository, please contact biwfc@botstiber.org.

EFFECTS OF PREGNANCY PREVENTION ON BRUCELLA ABORTUS SHEDDING IN AMERICAN BISON (BISON BISON)

2024-07-16T13:37:31+00:00Tags: , |

Bovine brucellosis, caused by Brucella abortus,
primarily affects bovids, although species
from other families may be affected as well,
including humans. Brucella abortus infection
causes reproductive failures such as abortion,
stillbirths, and weak neonates (Rhyan et al.
2001; Olsen and Tatum 2010). The predominant
mode of transmission is via infectious
products of parturition, as aborted or nonviable
fetuses, neonates, and associated tissues and fluids
may be heavily colonized by bacteria. Contact
with these materials by herd members
facilitates a mucosal route of introduction of
B. abortus into susceptible animals (Rhyan and
Nol 2019). Other, less frequent, modes of transmission
of B. abortus include ingestion of
infected milk, or contact with infected genitalia
or feces (Cheville et al. 1998).
Brucellosis, probably introduced by cattle
(Bos taurus), was first detected in bison of the
Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) of the US in
the early twentieth century, and had emerged
in the GYA elk (Cervus canadensis) population
by the 1930s (US Department of the
Interior 2000; Rhyan and Nol 2019). Since
the 1950s, a cooperative state–federal brucellosis
eradication program has largely eliminated
B. abortus from US domestic cattle and
bison herds. Nevertheless, disease reservoirs
in GYA free-ranging bison and elk populations
still persist, and spillovers to domestic
livestock occur (Ragan 2002; Olsen 2010).
Annually, managers expend great efforts to maintain
temporal and spatial separation between wild
bison herds and domestic livestock, although data
indicate that infected elk are the primary source
of B. abortus cases in domestic cattle and bison in
the GYA (Rhyan et al. 2013b; Kamath et al. 2016;
National Academies of Sciences, Engineering,
and Medicine 2020).
Test-and-remove is the most common management
tool applied to brucellosis-affected
livestock herds in the US (Ragan 2002). However,
traditional lethal approaches to disease
management of livestock are not necessarily
compatible with what is considered feasible
or socially acceptable when it comes to managing
and conserving wildlife (Bienen and
Tabor 2006). Research suggests that immunocontraception
could be used as a nonlethal
method to decrease B. abortus transmission
in GYA bison herds (Miller et al. 2004; Rhyan
et al. 2013a). We describe here an experiment
designed to assess whether preventing pregnancy,
using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone
(GnRH) –based immunocontraceptive,
in B. abortus–seropositive female bison would
reduce probability of B. abortus shedding
within a treated herd.

10 October 2023 and Journal of Wildlife Diseases (2024)
Pauline Nol, Rebecca Frey, Morgan Wehtje, Jack Rhyan, Patrick Ryan Clarke, Matthew Mccollum, Christine Quance, Douglas Eckery, Suelee Robbe-austerman,
Vol. 60, Iss. 2.
DOI: 10.7589/jwd-d-21-00167.
PDF: https://wildlifefertilitycontrol.org/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/Effects-of-Pregnancy-Prevention-on-Brucella-abortus-Shedding-in.pdf
Pauline Nol, Rebecca Frey, Morgan Wehtje, Jack Rhyan, Patrick Ryan Clarke, Matthew Mccollum, Christine Quance, Douglas Eckery, Suelee Robbe-austerman,
(2024).
EFFECTS OF PREGNANCY PREVENTION ON BRUCELLA ABORTUS SHEDDING IN AMERICAN BISON (BISON BISON).
10 October 2023 and Journal of Wildlife Diseases
60(2)
doi: 10.7589/jwd-d-21-00167.

Share This Story, Choose Your Platform!

Go to Top